#deadartistsociety Marisol Escobar

The idea of waiting for something makes it more exciting.
— Andy Warhol
crystal moody | #deadartistsociety Marisol Escobar

A new month means a new artist. I began with the quote above, this image, and a hint...

July's artist for #deadartistsociety has connections with Andy Warhol, Alice Neel, and Georgia O'Keeffe.

And then I headed out for a long weekend camping trip. I don't get many guesses but I kinda like doing these little teasers on the first day of the month. It's also a nice simple image that breaks up my Instagram feed and signals a new artist.

 

The artist is Maria Sol Escobar. She was born May 22, 1930 in Paris, the second child of Venezuelan parents. She soon took the nickname Marisol, which means sea and sun in Spanish. 

Marisol Escobar
crystal moody | #deadartistsociety Marisol Escobar

Marisol was the second child of Gustavo and Josefina Hernandez Escobar. They lived on their assets in oil and real estate. They frequently traveled between Europe, the U.S, and Venezuela. 

The piece below is based on a family photograph from her childhood and the only work of hers that depicts all of the Escobars at once. Her parents are in a circle at the top and the family of four in the center showing sort of a progression from couple to family. Fragments of overlapping hands and faces (a common motif for Marisol) surround the family. 

Family Portrait, 1961 lithograph by Marisol Escobar.

Family Portrait, 1961 lithograph by Marisol Escobar.

When Marisol was 11 years old her mother Josefina committed suicide. Her father sent her to boarding school on Long Island.

crystal moody | #deadartistsociety Marisol Escobar
When I was eleven years old I decided never to talk again. I didn’t want to sound the way other people did. I really didn’t talk for years except for what was absolutely necessary in school and on the street. They used to think I was crazy. I was into my late twenties before I started talking again––and silence had become such a habit that I really had nothing to say to anybody.
— Marisol Escobar
Mi Mama y Yo, 1968 steel and aluminum sculpture by Marisol Escobar.

Mi Mama y Yo, 1968 steel and aluminum sculpture by Marisol Escobar.

In this sculpture of Marisol and her mother, Marisol stands on a bench next to her mother. "Dressed in different shades of pink, they are literally and figuaratively joined under the umbrella Mariosol holds over them. In contrast to her mother's smile, however the young artist scowls, though her discordant expression is mitigated by the presence of a fanciful blue and yellow umbrella. This tension no doubt reflects her family history. The sculpture's importance to Mariosl is evident in the fact that she never sold it." from Marisol: Sculptures and Works on Paper.


Marisol began making art at a young age. Her father moved the family to Los Angeles in 1946 and Marisol (at the age of 16) began taking night classes at the Otis Art Institute and the Jepson Art Institute. 

The Family, 1957 crayon and graphite

The Family, 1957 crayon and graphite

detail of untitled, 1957 colored crayon and pencil

detail of untitled, 1957 colored crayon and pencil

I can never remember a time when I wasn’t drawing.
— Marisol Escobar 
crystal moody | #deadartistsociety Marisol Escobar

I did a portrait of Marisol last year for my Monday Mournings series and so for this portrait I was looking to do something a bit different than before. I ended up using a reference photo of Marisa with longer hair and went for a more geometric look.